November 2015 Final Issue
Home / Do-Gooders / How an Ordinary, Everyday Mother Can Change the World

How an Ordinary, Everyday Mother Can Change the World

I never planned to start a non-profit. But then again, I didn’t plan to fall in love, either. It happened on a bloggers’ trip to Uganda this past winter. I fell in love with a third world country. I fell in love with an ebony people, with the red dirt roads and the lush green of banana trees, with barefoot mamas bearing babies on their backs and yellow water jugs on their heads, and with daughters balancing more water behind them. I fell in love with the cows lying in the middle of intersections, with the chickens and the dogs and the smell of plantain and a world that lived outside—because there was nothing inside except dirt floors covered in thin mattresses or burlap sacks for sleeping. They cooked, swept, washed dishes, and did the laundry together, as a community. They had nothing to hide. LuluTree2 We took a charter plane to Gulu to meet former child soldiers who were picking up the pieces of their ravaged past and becoming seamstresses and mechanics, and I couldn’t stop hugging them, trying somehow to relieve the horrors of the past. We flew back to Kampala and visited the slum of Katwe. The alleys were full of garbage and children had bare, distended bellies. I walked down those alleys and shook the hands of mothers who were bent over dirty buckets of water. Their eyes held the pain of a thousand sleepless nights within them. I bent low and picked up as many tiny children as possible, kissed their thin cheeks and felt the emptiness of their future. We traveled by van to a nearby village, then, to a children’s home, where I met my sponsor child. And I met his mother. She’d walked four hours just to meet me. Her soles were red from Uganda’s earth and she didn’t break a sweat in the high heat. Her eyes shone but she lowered them, looked at her sandals, even as I reached out a hand to touch her shoulder, and I could feel the strength in this peasant farmer’s arm. She’d lost her husband just weeks earlier to HIV/AIDS, an illness people still talk about in hushed tones because of the shame associated with it. She’d lost her children long before that to this home I was visiting—because she had a sick husband to care for and a farm that wasn’t bringing in money and no way to feed her sons or daughters. And here I was, able to pay for her kids’ clothes and education while she wasn’t. And not because I worked harder. No, she worked sun-up to sundown and had callouses across her hands and feet. No, it was because I came from a first class country overflowing with food and privilege while the rest of the world is forced to feed from our trash cans. I smiled at her, but I felt sick. I am a mother. Every night I walk into my boys’ room and ache for them lying there in their beds, because I cannot eliminate the pain they will encounter in life. I cannot imagine how humbling or humiliating it would be to have to ask someone else to take care of my children. To not be able to give them food or water, to not be able to keep them under your own roof and THEN, to walk four hours to meet the woman who can? This woman (me) who flies over in her airplane with her suitcase full of clothes and her bag full of lipstick and her wallet full of money, and says it’s all in the name of Jesus—a God this farmer worships more reverently each day than I ever have in my life? LuluTree1Our Father weeps. He anguishes over every single mother—because there are hundreds of thousands of them across Africa in the same situation—who has to lose her child, who cannot take care of her children. And friends? He’s asking us to do something about it. Sponsoring a child is good, don’t get me wrong. I sponsor as many children as I am able. But standing there with this beautiful woman in her brown hat and her downcast gaze, her son’s eyes shining as he looked at me, I thought: No. Enough. There has to be more. I want this son to look at his MOTHER with adoration, not me—a stranger. I want him to look at HER to provide his needs, not me—an outsider who didn’t birth him without an epidural, who didn’t weep and pray over him every night of his childhood, who didn’t spend every minute of every day trying to earn enough money to buy him a bowl of Matoke (cooked banana) so he wouldn’t starve to death. Upon returning home to Canada, I spent months falling on my knees after my family went to bed. I would bow low on the carpet in front of the wood stove and cry. I kept seeing those HIV-positive babies lying in the dirt crying for mothers who wouldn’t come because they’re dead. Those teenage boys sniffing glue to numb their hunger pains. Those grandmothers working 20-hour days to find enough food for their dead daughter’s children who lay on the ground while chickens defecate around them. I didn’t start a non-profit to help mothers in the slum of Katwe because I felt guilty. I just knew that my life could not be the same, because once God opens your eyes to people’s suffering, you become responsible. I could no longer pretend I hadn’t seen. I could no longer pretend everyone in the world lived as I did. I knew better. And it had wrecked me. Our vision at The Lulu Tree is to work with widowed, HIV-positive mothers in the slum of Katwe, Uganda (the worst of Kampala’s eight slums), equipping them to take care of their kids. Our slogan is “Preventing tomorrow’s orphans by equipping today’s mothers.” Lofty, I know. But you have to dream big, right? Shoot for the moon and you’ll land somewhere among the stars? So we’re shooting for the moon. Yet it’s taken reading countless books like When Helping Hurts, The Blue Sweater, and The Hole in Our Gospel; it’s taken talking to numerous other non-profit organizations and thinking I had a plan and then realizing my plan was wrong. It’s taken trying to do things on my own and then realizing I needed to hire nationals who had a heart for their people, who lived there, who understood things like not giving the mamas too much sponsorship money or it would steal their instinct to survive—it’s taken all of this to realize, again, that it’s not about me doing something for them. It’s about us working with each other, for God. It’s about us doing laundry and life, together—outside, under the sun, in view of everyone else, because we’ve got nothing to hide. I’m no one special, friends. I just have a heart, as do you. If we allow God to use our hearts—if we allow His love to define us, to shape us, and to overflow through us—He can change the world. LuluTree5Will you consider partnering with us today friends? The Lulu Tree is a fledgling organization which survives off the generosity of people like you. We carry some beautiful products, made by local mamas, in our Lulu Tree Boutique. One hundred percent of the profits from these products go towards the women we’re helping in Katwe, Uganda. Quilts, baby boots, knitted toques, accessories, dolls, and more—they make for trendy gifts that carry a purpose. Visit HERE to peruse our shop—and note, FREE shipping with every purchase! If you’d like to partner with us in another way, we’d love to hear from you. Just contact us using our website, and we’ll be sure to connect with you as soon as possible. Bless you, sisters, as you wrap your arms around a hurting world. *Photos by Allyn Lyttle of the World Help Organization
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About Emily Wierenga

Emily Wierenga
Emily T. Wierenga is an award-winning journalist, blogger, commissioned artist and columnist, and the author of five books including the memoir Atlas Girl: Finding Home in the Last Place I Thought to Look (Baker Books). All proceeds from Atlas Girl benefit Emily’s non-profit, The Lulu Tree. She lives in Alberta, Canada with her husband and two sons. For more info, please visit www.emilywierenga.com. Find her on Twitter or Facebook.

One comment

  1. Erika Núñez

    I will like to be part of this projects, I’m from México, and many times before I was thinking in a ONGs to help in my country but unfortunatly I don’t have enough economics resources to build a ONG by myself , so I will like to help people that can do.
    Sincerely…
    Erika

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